Posting Progress

January 8, 2012 | Comments Off on Posting Progress | Social Media & Marketing

It’s a week into the new year, and I’m here to report back about my progress.

My work these days is largely Boxcar, but I’m still doing freelance work for Numana, Chautauqua Hills Farm, and sometimes others on the side.

It’s very gratifying to get comments back at Boxcar like:

In the past week I helped complete the editing and posting of an e-book on considerations with regards to successfully growing blueberries for Chautauqua Hills Farm.

I also made further progress in reading through the Howard Schultz book, and had a positive email exchange with a local business.

And just before the end of the year, I finally bit the bullet and got a P.O. Box, so I could let domain privacy expire here and start an (infrequent) e-newsletter if I want. So my Contact page will likely soon be being updated!

Excited about that, and look forward to having more to report soon!

 


Happy New Year – Here’s to Finishing!

January 1, 2012 | Comments Off on Happy New Year – Here’s to Finishing! | Social Media & Marketing

This is a three-paragraph post – short and to the point. First, I’m very glad to have had this blog/website for nearly a year now. In conjunction with my freelance work, it’s been great to have a place to point people to when they ask what I do (and I love having matching business cards and note pad). Despite being busy with school and work, it’s motivated me to keep working on my own projects and learning too.

One of those projects this past year was reading – I had a list of books I wanted to read, and while I didn’t get to all of them, I did read far more than I had been the previous year, and even in this last week I completed two more books from my list – The Happiness Project by Gretchen Rubin, and SWITCH: How to Change Things When Change is Hard by Chip & Dan Heath. Both were great, and I’m currently engaged in reading Pour Your Heart Into It by Howard Schultz, about the founding and growth of Starbucks through about 1997.

The goal these days is results…and the way I’m promoting that is by blogging about things after I complete them. It’s an emphasis on finishing, and it’s been serving me well. I was inspired by conversations with friends about the respective values of progress, effort, and results, and by this great article from Jon Acuff. It’s often easy to start new things and hard to finish old ones. So instead of new resolutions, I’m just posting on my blog. Today. And reading a book from last year’s list. And it feels great. Happy New Year!

 


The Flying Stove!

December 30, 2011 | Comments Off on The Flying Stove! | Social Media & Marketing

I was sitting at my desk, working on various tasks, when I started hearing someone talk about The Flying Stove, and how it was just down the street today – and they were serving burritos.

Curious, I kept listening and asked some questions of my own, adding to the others flying around the office – did they have a website? Did they take credit cards? Vegetarian options?

The answers turned out to be yes (in progress – ’cause I don’t think they serve Lorem Ipsum, though I have a feeling that would be a literary treat as worth trying as C.S. Lewis’s “Turkish Delight”), yes (learned via a quick phone call that was immediately and cheerfully answered, from what I gathered), and yes (this was discovered via the website).

What was there to lose? A whole bunch of colleagues decided to step out into the chilly but sunny day and walk en masse over to the mobile restaurant, described on the company’s Twitter page as “Bad Mutha Food Trucka-Gourmet Street Cuisine.”

I got there shortly afterwards, and could immediately see the fun of it all, from the way the truck/bus was decorated to the conversation happening while in line.

Not to mention the colorful menu board (which, by the way, was easy to read, had handy tax-included even-dollar prices, and great food titles and descriptions). Then they turned on the music and it got even better.

It was a bit chilly outside, especially in the shade, and my colleagues decided to take their food back to the office.

However, in the sun it was quite pleasant, and I opted for some Vitamin D as I ate my delicious “Flying Burrito” – marinated (tender!) chicken, heirloom tomatoes, and mint raita, according to the menu board.

Arleigh's Delicious Burrito

I’d chosen to get a “main” for $7, but I could have added a side and drinks for two bucks.

And believe me, after tasting a friend’s “truffle herbed fries,” I made a note to strongly consider that option next time!

The guy at the counter told me to tell him how I liked the food, and I came back to say it was delicious – I’d blog, tweet, the whole bit. And here I am.

If you catch wind that they’re in your area (by the way, Twitter and Facebook are really good for that), they’re definitely worth checking out.

Bring your friends, take pictures, enjoy the experience.

And then tell me about it – I want to hear. And I’m sure, so do they.

 


Word of Mouth & Social Media

November 2, 2011 | Comments Off on Word of Mouth & Social Media | Engaging Events, Social Media & Marketing

I had the opportunity this evening to speak briefly on the topic of social media at a workshop hosted by Our Local Food in the context of promoting local restaurants and growers. If you’re one of the people who attended, I’m so glad you stopped by my website! Please feel free to comment below or drop me an email with any questions or comments!

A recurring theme at the event was the need to establish and maintain connections between growers, chefs, and end consumers. Social media is an excellent tool for this. Local and/or organic eaters tend to be passionate people who are happy to talk up a good cause or eaterie when they find one! You still have the challenge of making the first connection in real life, but if you have a quality product at a reasonable price, word does spread. It spreads even faster if you have the tools in place to facilitate interaction and spotlighting/sharing your treasures.

I spoke just after my client, Lance, owner of Chautauqua Hills Farm – a blueberry grower. He shared about Chautauqua’s voice and message – how they/we try to focus on positive, educational, relevant content. We’re not touting CHF as a poster child for excellent social media use…both of us are busy, and right now since blueberries aren’t in season there’s less pressure to be active on the website or other social networks like Facebook. BUT we do have those platforms ready to swing back into action when the berries are in season again, and as we have time, we continue to work on content in the meantime for less frequent, but still-happening posts. It comes down to knowing what you want to say, managing your links and resources so you have them ready when you need them, and then taking advantage of tools to organize your time and thoughts and share both with others.

Several great users of social media were in attendance…Our Local Food, Food for Thought, Tanya Tandoc of Tanya’s Soup Kitchen, and Tim Tuckerbee of Tuckerbee’s Honey and the American Beekeeping Federation as well as others. If you have any interest in local foods or growing, I encourage you to check out their social media presence (and websites) too. Doing so will give you some different ideas for how to approach your audience and what kind of content might work for your message. In addition, connecting with them by “liking” their Facebook Pages or following on Twitter helps you stay in the loop with their updates, subtly emphasize your support of local food to your friends, and make those all-powerful connections between chef and consumer, consumer and grower, etc…

I’m not about to tell you social media work is a piece of cake…so simple you could do it in your sleep. To do it well does take time and energy, both of which can be lacking for a busy grower. But if you treat it like an investment or even like planting seeds…the benefits you reap can be extensive. Aim for consistency, authenticity, and at the same time – have fun!

And if you’d kind of like to try out some ideas with social media, but don’t want to jump in all the way, let us help you get the word out. A little cross-promotion will do both you and us (speaking for Chautauqua Hills Farm) good! If you have the time and feel you can write well and have something to say, write up a guest blog post for us! If you’re looking for something that will take less time, we’d be glad to send you some questions for an email interview that we can also post on our blog (and you can share with your friends and customers). Drop me a line if you’re interested.

 

 


Segundo de September

September 2, 2011 | Comments Off on Segundo de September | Social Media & Marketing

It’s the second of September. Those who’ve studied Spanish will note that segundo, the word for “second,” also sounds like según, the word for “according to” or “depending on.” So we’ll say this post title serves a dual purpose of noting the date and explaining September according to Olivia. Because really, this post is not so much to tell stories about my summer (which was wonderful and refreshing), as to say that I’m back, glad to be here, and ready to engage once again in the wonderful world of social media and blogging.

Boxcar LogoI’m taking a lighter semester this fall and really enjoying each of my classes. This has freed me up to take on some additional work, and in addition to my continued freelance work for my clients and Numana, I’m very excited to now be working on marketing & PR for Boxcar, a company with an app that delivers push notifications to your iPhone, iPad, iPod or Mac desktop from email and your favorite social networks. Windows desktop and Android releases are also in the works.

One of my favorite parts of my new job, besides the variety, is the customer service aspect. I’m really looking forward to picking up enough experience with our service to be able to help with tech support. Using social media and other avenues to directly connect with customers and fans and make their day better thrills me. And it doesn’t hurt that I now have access to an iPod Touch for my work, which is not only fun to use, but genuinely useful, especially on the go (not to mention idea-inspiring – makes me want to try my own hand at making an app or two down the road).

I’ve got a number of interesting books on my shelf right now, which I plan to read in the next few weeks, including Getting Things DONE by David Allen, The Filter Bubble: What the Internet is Hiding From You by Eli Pariser, The Smart Swarm: How Understanding Flocks, Schools, and Colonies Can Make Us Better at Communicating, Decision Making, and Getting Things Done by Peter Miller, and The Five Dysfunctions of a Team by Patrick Lencioni. In fact, that’s where I’m headed right now. Have you read a book this month? Do it!

 

 


7 Summer Strategies for Social Media, Part 2

June 9, 2011 | Comments Off on 7 Summer Strategies for Social Media, Part 2 | Social Media & Marketing

To review just a bit, this two-part series is aimed at college students who want to maximize their summer, particularly those in the marketing/communications/tech/consulting fields. We covered points 1-3 in 7 Summer Strategies for Social Media, Part 1, and are wrapping up the series with points 4-7 in this post. For convenience, here’s the list again:

  1. Social Media Study – exploring social media tools, reading books, attending seminars
  2. Skill Development – developing skills outside of social media – writing, programming, photography, etc…
  3. Sorting & Systems – setting up systems for organization & efficient management of bookmarked links, emails & files
  4. Summer Schedule – chunking, doing the next thing, taking advantage of flexibility
  5. Social Media Work – seasonal emphasis, consistency, scheduling & communication
  6. Strategic Development – long-range planning, conducting surveys, developing personal brand & style, SEO
  7. Spread Reach – sharing & engaging with Twitter chats, social events, networking, suggesting resources

Summer Schedule

One of the things I love best about summer, quite honestly, is the chance to sleep in. It’s not that I’m lazy – in some ways I’m more productive than ever once I have the freedom to stay up late without worrying about the consequences of waking up late or skipping sufficient sleep. I’m a natural night owl, and so while I think sleep is important to make time for in any schedule, I’m not actually going to suggest the whole “pick a regular schedule, get to sleep by 10 every night, get at least 8 hours of sleep and be consistent” concept. Rather, I think within reason, we should take the opportunity for flexibility to work in the blocks of time that work best for us, whether that’s early morning, in the middle of the night, or right after lunch.

What I do think is important is figuring out how and when you’re most productive, and using that to your advantage. Some of the things that work well for me are “chunking” my schedule (more on that in a moment), and “doing the next thing.” By “chunking” my schedule, I merely mean taking a 2-4 hour block to focus on a particular project, instead of trying to be productive with a round-robin line-up of fifteen minutes on email here, 30 minutes reading there. This morning I read an entire book on blogging because I picked it up shortly after waking, and didn’t let myself turn on the computer till I was done. Then I did the laundry. Now I’m writing this blog post…nothing else (okay, maybe I have Pandora open, but you get the idea).

The tendency for people in social media I think sometimes is to want to be everywhere at once, and while multi-tasking works fine sometimes (e.g. I might Tweet here and there in-between IMing someone or skimming an article), sometimes it can really fragment overall productivity too. By “doing the next thing” I simply mean prioritizing in the moment. I have many, many things I could be working on in a given day, and while strategic long-range planning is certainly important (see below), sometimes my best feel for what needs to be done next comes as I crest the hill just before that horizon. This works well with chunking, in that I feel better getting things completely crossed off my list, and I can see myself making progress towards my overall goals.

Social Media Work

Of course, if you’re a marketing or social media consultant, you can’t forget the actual work you’ll be doing over the summer either! Depending on the industry, summer may be a quiet or particularly busy time for your clients, and therefore for you. For instance, it’s a bit quieter for Numana, a hunger relief organization I work with, as many people are going on vacation, and we also don’t have as many food packaging events at schools as we do during the school year. On the other hand, for my client Satchel Creek Steaks, this is grilling season, and demand goes up tremendously for Tiya’s all-natural steaks and other meats during the summer. My client Chautauqua Hills Farm has a similar uptick in demand, since the pick-your-own blueberry season starts this week and people’s mouths have been watering for their “nickel-size” blueberries ever since last summer!

The key here is continue to do excellent work for past clients while keeping your eyes out for potential new ones while you have more time. It may be that some of your current clients will phase out of needing your services by the end of the summer, and you want to be prepared with new ones to take their place. This is also a very important time to make sure that you keep frequent communication going back and forth, while everyone’s busy, so that you stay on the same page on what’s needed. I’ve found it helpful to create a Google Doc spreadsheet with a posting/media schedule to share with my client, so that we can maintain consistency. In my case, I’m also looking at doing scalable (in the sense of expandable) projects like social media workshops, where I can help several people at once without taking on the responsibility of having them all as long-term clients. This will allow me to scale back in the fall when I need to once again concentrate more intently on my studies.

Strategic Development

Much of this topic is covered in bits and pieces of previous ones, but I still think it bears a couple paragraphs of its own. In addition to developing technical skills and workable systems, it’s important I think, to use the summer as a time for self-exploration and long-range strategic planning as well. Where do you want your business to be in five years? What do you want to be doing in 3 years? Do you enjoy what you do, and if there are elements that you don’t, are there ways to contract that portion of your business out or expand in the areas you do enjoy?

Take some time to hammer out some of your personal brand and style elements – do you want to be straight-forward or more subtle? Do you want to write frequent, short posts, or is your style a bit more on the detailed side? What are some of the key words and phrases that define your mission and values – those that will not only help build your brand from an SEO perspective, but in terms of reaching the clients and audience you want?

In addition to self-exploration, summer is a good time to take stock and reevaluate your effectiveness and clients’ needs as well. Think ahead about what you might be able to fit in at a less busy time (like early fall) to develop and improve your services.  Possibilities include taking some time to sit down with clients (or even other colleagues in your line of work) to chat about goals and long-term plans or wishes or running a survey with a book or extra consulting services given away in a drawing as a prize for submitting feedback.

Spread Reach

This is the fun part that ties everything else together. You’ve got a plan, you know what interests you, you’re meeting the needs of your current clients…now it’s time to expand. Go out there and network! Take the time to interact via blog comments. Write people that impress you and thank them for their work. Hand out business cards, retweet others and mention them on Twitter, maybe even participate in a regular Twitter chat every week.

Be helpful and see what resources you can match up with people who might appreciate them. Keep a listening ear and learn all you can. Be constantly looking to see whom you can refer to others. Maybe take a road trip and set up meetings with people you’ve only known so far online (carefully, of course!), or try doing a bit more snail mail or actual phone calls.

I really enjoy this aspect of summer. I actually have time to check in on Twitter throughout the day, time to go read some articles and blog posts and maybe even comment, time to catch up on emails and letters to friends. It doesn’t all have to be business-related, but the great thing is that even if it’s not technically business-related, you’re still forming connections and strengthening current friendships that will hopefully continue to be mutually beneficial to both of you down the road. The further you can spread your reach over the summer, the more opportunities you’ll have to take advantage of in the fall and winter.

And now it’s your turn…what are your summer strategies? I’d love to hear – and thanks for stopping by!

(Continued from 7 Summer Strategies for Social Media, Part 1)

 

 


7 Summer Strategies for Social Media, Part 1

This post is primarily written for college students, who have the summer off from regular studies, but I believe anyone who wants to maximize their summer in the social media sphere can benefit. I welcome your input and suggestions in the comments below – what are your summer strategies for social media?

As I mentioned in Summer: The Fun of Business, I’m taking the summer off from classes and focusing primarily on my freelance consulting business. I recognize that not all college students have this luxury – for many, the summer may mean a brief vacation and then lots of hours put into a summer job to help save towards college expenses. For others, their summer may still be full of short college classes in an effort to build up needed hours towards a degree.

But for those of you who want to take advantage of summer’s flexibility to develop a consulting business, study in preparation for classes you’ll take in the fall, or even just better manage your personal brand, I want to outline a few strategies that I am working on implementing for myself this summer that I think may be of benefit to you too. I’ll cover items 1-3 in this post, 4-7 in another.

  1. Social Media Study – exploring social media tools, reading books, attending seminars
  2. Skill Development – developing skills outside of social media – writing, programming, photography, etc…
  3. Sorting & Systems – setting up systems for organization & efficient management of bookmarked links, emails & files
  4. Summer Schedule – chunking, doing the next thing, taking advantage of flexibility
  5. Social Media Work – seasonal emphasis, consistency, scheduling & communication
  6. Strategic Development – long-range planning, conducting surveys, developing personal brand & style, SEO
  7. Spread Reach – sharing & engaging with Twitter chats, social events, networking, suggesting resources

All right, let’s go ahead and break these points down into a bit more detail. Ultimately, the goal is to have a synergistic system that incorporates both social time, skill development, and social media work.

Social Media Study

During the school year, much of my social media work ends up being relegated to maintenance mode and traditional tried-and-true methods. Sure, I’ll have a few new and interesting projects come up now and then, and sometimes I will research or try a new tool, but it’s usually based on client needs & demands rather than primarily out of personal interest. Summer is the perfect time to explore trends and tools in social media.

Just yesterday, I tried Hootsuite for the first time (I’m already an avid Tweetdeck user) and downloaded Skype. Neither of these are particularly new tools in the online world, but I don’t have much experience with either, and both for my own sake, out of curiosity, and to better advise and assist my clients, I want to have more familiarity with them. In past weeks I’ve been learning more about Evernote, signed up on Empire Avenue, and tried a mindmapping tool called WiseMapping. The point is to work on expanding your social media knowledge while your schedule is a bit more flexible.

Skill Development

It’s not just social media you can work on exploring and mastering though…there are lots of other relevant business skills to work on developing over the summer for any marketing/consulting biz. Remember that you are a better writer if you read a lot (and write a lot, for that matter), and that being well-read means more than reading just social media articles. It’s a great time to actually go to the library and get a stack of books on a variety of topics (outside of business & marketing too), attend seminars and workshops in areas of interest like photography or editing, and take up new hobbies.

You never know when your new hobby might mean a new client (for instance, I’m hoping to take up horseback-riding, and have already helped someone who offers rides in the Flint Hills with his Facebook Page on several occasions). In addition, it just makes for more interesting writing when you can bring in real-life examples and anecdotes to your blog posts and even your client interaction.

Of primary importance here are the technical and fundamental skills like writing, programming, web design, etc… In my case, this serves a dual purpose – e.g. I’m playing with an Arduino to better my C/C++ programming, both for fun and in preparation for classes in the fall. I’m planning to practice my stickshift driving in anticipation of saving up for a manual car I can save on gas mileage with, etc… Find your own unique pursuits and then set aside consistent chunks of time to make progress in those areas. And be sure to document that progress for your portfolio and resumé.

Sorting & Systems

You want your business to run as smoothly as possible when you have to get back into the daily grind of classes, homework, study groups, and tests. The best way to help that happen is to use the summer to strategize, sort, and set up systems that work for you. This means getting off of irrelevant email mailing lists, coming up with a filing/labeling system for your email client, going through those stacks of books and piles of papers where you may currently know the location of every important item, but won’t in six months when things get hectic, and taking a serious look at how to best order your schedule. There are all kinds of helpful tools to help you do this, which goes back to a) experimenting while you have time and then b) figuring out what works best for you.

In my case, I know one thing I really need to work on in this area is my bookmarking strategy. I’m constantly favoriting Tweets just to save a link that I might want to reference or read later, bookmarking videos and “read later” links on Diigo, and I still have a sizable list of favorites that I copied over from my previous laptop and may never get to. I could delete them and start fresh, but while I have time, I’d rather go ahead and read, sort and/or delete them, and then come up with a system that helps me keep things orderly and easily accessible going forward. Same thing with old Word documents I have saved off my old computer – yes, I know where things are and can access them without too much trouble, but the clutter slows down my computer and overall efficiency.

Continued in 7 Summer Strategies for Social Media, Part 2…(coming on June 9th)

 

 


Blueberries, Business Cards, and Books

May 18, 2011 | Comments Off on Blueberries, Business Cards, and Books | Social Media & Marketing

One of my clients, Chautauqua Hills Farm, is nearing their blueberry picking season. We recently sent out an email update showing pictures of the early fruiting bushes, and let customers know that they could sign up to be on a list to be notified when the “Nickel-Size Blueberries” are ready to harvest. Eager, swift replies showed a definite pent-up demand for the tasty, naturally grown berries.

What’s exciting for me is not only seeing the word spread through email, in-person, and social media avenues, but the fact that I get to promote products and services I believe in. In this case, I absolutely love blueberries, and I also appreciate the use of healthy, natural growing methods.

Early Fruiting Variety - Growing Blueberries!

So it was a win-win for me when Lance, the owner, spoke as a guest speaker in one of my classes last fall, and I was able to approach him about developing Chautauqua Hill’s use of social media, including Facebook, Twitter, and an email newsletter.

I’ve really enjoyed working with CHF. Not only have they been patient with my busy school schedule, but they bring lots of ideas to the table for content and marketing with their values and style in mind.

I’ve continued to develop my WordPress skills, worked back and forth with another freelancer who set up their website and is currently developing the e-commerce side, and learned a lot about blueberries and healthy food in the process.

Blueberries aren’t grown to a great extent in KS, and besides being pretty, tasty, and fun to eat, there’s a certain delight in picking and eating food yourself. But enough about blueberries. My takeaways for you today are simple, but sometimes simple things are the most important to implement.

I think the reminder Chautauqua Hills Farm provides is to provide something of value, something people want. If that happens, people will talk it up for you. Once you’ve earned that trust and interest, the marketing of a quality niche product almost takes care of itself.

And if you feel you have a great product, but people haven’t caught on yet, hang in there…with consistent and relevant communication, you’ll eventually get through.

The other two “B’s” in my post today are business cards and books. I had the occasion to hand out a few more of my business cards this evening after attending a meeting, and one person really liked my card. The background is the same as this website, and I have a number of ways of contacting me listed on the front. I kept the back clear for writing notes (e.g. offers for free initial consults, etc…).

Already they’re a little outdated, as I now have an About.me page and am working on my Facebook Page behind the scenes, the links for both of which I’ll probably put on my next printing of business cards, but I’m so glad I got them done when I did. Many times prior I’d wished I had one to give out, and finally had resorted to at least giving out small strips of paper printed with a color version of my avatar and a few links, to at least have something.

My takeaway here is to not always wait till something’s perfect before you move forward on it. Too often as perfectionists or procrastinators or both, it’s easy to put something on the back burner till we feel it’s completely ready. But even though I knew I’d probably eventually have more links, a P.O. Box, and more to put on business cards, I also knew I had enough to get started with for now. And you do too. Whether it’s printing business cards or some other project, doing something is progress.

As a side note, I did find this list of 10 Features of a Memorable Business Card invaluable,  from Interview Angel, as I created my cards and thought through what I wanted to accomplish. Even though I didn’t implement all 10 ideas, I felt my card turned out better for having thought through these suggestions.

Finally, my last topic of the night is books. I checked out a book at the library today which a friend told me about recently (the book version of The Princess Bride), and as I noted yesterday, one of my goals this summer is to take time to read a lot more. Besides just the knowledge value of being well-read and staying up on ideas, old and new, in one’s industry (and others, for that matter), books are valuable as a business example here because of the way they are shared.

Someone will lend a book out from his or her personal lending library, someone else will check a book out at a library, and still another will read on his Kindle (I’ve been seeing a LOT of people’s comments about reading more on Kindles and Nooks than they had been reading from regular books, and it makes me curious about trying one). You can summarize or narrate a story for someone else, convert it into a movie plot line, it can make you laugh or cry…in other words, a book is versatile.

For me, the lesson of blueberries, business cards, and books is in creating things that are quality and in-demand, shareable, and versatile. Your thoughts?

 


Summer: The Fun of Business

May 17, 2011 | Comments Off on Summer: The Fun of Business | Social Media & Marketing

As a busy college student, by the end of the semester school can feel like the only thing I have time for. But I took my last final today, and that means that for me, summer has begun. The past two summers I’ve taken 3-5 credit hours, but this year I’m taking the summer completely off from any official school. It won’t, however, be devoid of learning. In fact, I have a number of skills and projects I intend to work on, from further developing my programming skills to improving my photography knowledge and experience.

One of the things I’m most excited about is expanding my freelance marketing and social media business, and generally getting back into a connected world of friends, acquaintances, and colleagues on blogs, Twitter, and beyond. I’ve opted not to take on a traditional summer job, and instead, focus on my freelance business as something that allows me to do what I love (with the added benefit of being on a semi-flexible schedule): helping people, networking, learning about technology, and getting the word out about useful resources and great products and services.

In the past few months, I’ve slowly but surely begun to make preparations and do research on a number of topics from taxes to P.O. boxes, started to build my brand by purchasing this domain name and business cards (and am having a lot of fun giving them out), and looked into advertising and hosting social media workshops. Already I have more than enough business to keep me well-occupied for a while, which is very nice. I was particularly excited to be asked to speak at a workshop next month on nonprofits and social media which is held annually, and which I went to just as a participant/attendee last year.

Just today, I received another book in the mail, which I won in the last week or two on Facebook. I’m looking forward to reading it and a number of other business books from my list for the year soon. Other projects planned include starting a Facebook Page for my business, creating my portfolio here on my website, and getting a post schedule in place for myself.

I know myself well enough to not put a public timeline on those items…life is already busy and will get busier, and in general, the needs of my clients (which they’ve graciously let me put on hold with school demands) must come first. But I’m still excited to be back, to have you reading, and to be sharing once again. I’d love to hear your plans for the summer and/or business; feel free to comment below!